The modern-day Bodie Island region from Nags Head to Oregon Inlet is sparsely developed, but nevertheless a popular destination for nature lovers and anglers alike. Visitors will find the following activities, attractions and amenities just miles away from the town borders of Nags Head, and all close to the distinguished Bodie Island Lighthouse.

Oregon Inlet Fishing Center - This massive marina is home to dozens of local charter fishing businesses and tour boats, as well as public boat launches, gas for mariners, and a ship's store.

Whalebone Junction - This small Visitors Center located just south of where NC Highway 12, US 158 and US 264 intersect, offers a small information center, public restrooms, and plenty of picturesque, rugged scenery.

Cape Hatteras National Seashore Campground - This seasonally operational campground, close to Oregon Inlet, offers 120 rustic campsites for tents and RVs. Open from the third weekend in April through Columbus Day Weekend, this popular campground is exceptionally close to Nags Head, as well as great fishing and beautiful beaches.

Bird watching - Visitors who are cruising along NC Highway 12 will spot a number of wooded bird stands that are stationed along the roadside from the town borders of Nags Head to Oregon Inlet. Open to the public, visitors can park just off the road and admire the soundside wildlife year-round, at any time of day or night.

Beach Driving - A Beach Driving Permit Office is located at the National Park Service Campground on Bodie Island, and there are three ORV access ramps in between Oregon Inlet and Nags Head. Remember that a NPS beach permit is required to drive on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore

Coquina Beach - Located just south of the Nags Head town borders, this beach is renowned for its exceptional fishing, 4WD vehicular access, and thousands of colorful coquina clams that seasonally burrow along the ocean wash.

 

The Cotton Gin

The Cotton Gin

Jarvisburg location is temporally closed. For those traveling to the Outer Banks, The Cotton Gin is a beloved landmark with its large windmill and picturesque gardens. The Cotton Gin has stood in the same location since 1929, starting as a working cotton gin and growing to a gift store with 4 locations. Visitors are treated to a unique shopping experience in our main store in Jarvisburg, as well as our beach stores in Corolla, Duck, and Nags Head. Explore room after room filled with décor for your home and coastal fashions for both men and women. Discover the brands you really want, like, Vera Bradley, Vineyard Vines, La Mer Luex, Simply Southern, Lindsay Phillips, Scout, Pandora, Kameleon, Brighton, Spartina, Tommy Bahama, Southern Tide and Salt Life and Old Guys Rule - all under one roof!

 

Don’t forget the gourmet market, or shop our beautiful linens for your bedroom and bath. We also feature coastal books and fine art, or just a whimsical fun gift to bring home to family and friends. Stop by soon and don’t forget to try our estate grown wines in our stores or visit our vineyard and winery, Sanctuary Vineyards, located adjacent to the original Cotton Gin in Jarvisburg.

 

Most know The Cotton Gin as a must-stop shop for fine gifts, beachwear, souvenirs and so much more, but this retailer has a long-standing history within the Outer Banks. A local landmark that holds almost a century of memories, The Cotton Gin started from humble beginnings and continues to adapt to the times and tourists. Tommy Wright’s family has been in the Outer Banks for nearly 200 years. His great-great grandfather, Jacob Francis Wright, shipwrecked in Duck back in the early 1800s. Calling these barrier islands his new home, Wright and his family acclimated to their new environment.

 

Adaptation is a common theme for the Wright family. Tommy and his wife Candace, who continue to steer The Cotton Gin, have seen not only their business change with the times, but the Outer Banks as a vacation destination as well. A farm market in Jarvisburg eventually transformed and flourished into several retail locations dotting the Outer Banks.

 

“As the area changed and tourism took off in the 1960s, the family saw people coming for vacations, so they began to grow vegetables and things developed from there,” says Tommy Wright. The Wright family expanded upon the farm market and began to remodel a working cotton gin, later transforming the gin into The Cotton Gin general store in the late 1960s. While the additions to the farm store drew visitors, it was their encounters with the Wright family that kept people coming back year after year, which is something that remains true today.

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